Sol Linero: Dreaming About Shoes, Poncho and Lupita

Released Tuesday, April 27, 2010


Dreaming About Shoes, Poncho and Lupita
, by Sol Linero.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Médecins Sans Frontières.

Sol Linero is a graphic designer from Argentina. She graduated from the University of Buenos Aires. After working for a while at a local design studio, she moved to Miami. She immersed herself in the American vintage style, falling in love at first sight. Sol has exquisite taste in color and a weakness for making cute things.

About the print:
When I start an illustration, it’s typical for me to get stuck in the idea phase. That's when I begin to bug my boyfriend, Jogu, to help me find a good way to illustrate a particular theme. This print was no exception, so Jogu started thinking of some themes that would fit my style. That particular day I was feeling especially blocked, so my response to any suggestions that he made was “mmmm, no". After a while, he suggested that I make a pair of pretty shoes, and being a sucker for shoes, I said yes. The shoe design began, but what else to include in the drawing so that the shoes weren't alone? Our dog Poncho, of course! As a welcome to the family, I added Lupita, our recently adopted kitty.

Dreaming About Shoes, Poncho and Lupita was signed and numbered by the artist. It is a six-color screenprint on Cordenons Insize Chagall 260 gsm acid-free paper.

PURCHASE $45!





What has inspired you recently?
Recently I was looking at a lot of home decor blogs, as we were remodeling our first house. That has been, and still is, a great and unexpected source of inspiration. I'm going crazy for Scandinavian furniture and strong wall colors. In general, I find inspiration in everyday objects, in things that catch my attention.

Your work seems to be highly narrative. What are the stories that inspire you or that you are working within?
A lot of my work is in animation. Many of them are narrative videos, which is why I think my prints tend to tell a story, too. I love cute, girlie, childish things, and I tend to go in that direction whenever I have the chance. I also love science fiction and adventure movies, and like to incorporate those elements into my work, too.

You print your work mainly through the medium of screenprinting. Does that inform the way that you design and your end product?
Definitely! Because I screenprint I use a limited color palette, which has translated over to the animation work that I do, too. I use a lot of transparency and superimposed colors. It's so cool to see how two colors mix together to make a third one!



Why did you choose to pair Médecins Sans Frontières with your print?
I already knew of Médecins Sans Frontières, and due to the recent catastrophes in Haiti and Chile, I decided that this was a good way to help the victims.

How have you seen art transform the world around you?
Over the last two years, I've been working on several pro-social and environmental projects. I see how art plays a big role in communicating these issues - not just on the advertising side, but also as a way to raise money through projects like The Working Proof.



If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
Charley Harper! I wish he had been my grandpa and had taught me to paint. I absolutely adore his work. The simple, yet strong illustrations he did are so perfect; the way he represents anything with just a few lines and basic shapes never ceases to amaze me.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
I think everyone should know about Marc Boutavant - he is my favorite illustrator right now. His characters are simply gorgeous! These are other excellent artist that I admire: Juliana Pedemonte, Jesse Lefkowitz, Kali Ciesemier, Gemma Correll, Apak, Little Friends of Printmaking, Meg Hunt, Lauren Gregg, and many more!

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