Owen Gatley: The Slaying of the Beast

Released Tuesday, July 27, 2010


The Slaying of the Beast, by Owen Gatley.
15% of the sale of this print goes to the Jane Goodall Institute.

Owen Gatley is an illustrator and designer who recently graduated from Bristol UWE, and now resides in his hometown of the Malvern Hills – a picturesque, small town in Worcestershire, England.

Owen’s work is influenced by 50s and 60s comic books, package design, and film posters. In addition to working with 2D illustration, he also enjoys working in 3D, particularly with making pop-ups and paper models. Owen calls himself a terrible perfectionist. When he's not drawing, Owen can be found playing his banjo and writing scores for film and animation.



About the print:
As a boy, I was obsessed with the tales of King Arthur and The Knights of the Round Table. I decided to form my own brotherhood of knights called 'The Order of Succor' ('Succor' meaning 'to come to someone's aid') and produced five pencil drawings depicting each knight of the Order. This piece shows Sir Digbeth, who won his knighthood by slaying the vicious dragon, Shirog.

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $30!





What has inspired you recently?
I bought some 1950s Eagle and Hot Rod comics a few weeks ago from a car boot sale and from eBay, as I've been doing a lot of work recently based around classic cars. I also just designed a collection of paper model cars, and the packaging design is very inspired by the 50s toy advertisements found in the Eagle comics.

Why did you choose to pair the Jane Goodall Institute with your print?
I chose this charity because too many of the earth's great species are under threat of extinction, and too many are poorly treated. I think it is really important that people have an increased awareness of the fragility of the environment and all its living things, as well as the importance of its preservation. The Jane Goodall Institute strives to do just that – to 'respect, nourish and protect all living things'.



How have you seen art transform the world around you?
So many ways. Art affects visual landscapes as much as it challenges perceptions, but for me personally, it has provided a very attractive alternative to getting an office job, and I really hope I will be lucky enough to pursue it as a career and way of life.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
That's a difficult one. I don't think I'd do to well at being mentored as I like making my own mistakes and solving my own problems. However, for my pop-ups, it would be great to be mentored by Robert Sabuda, the pop-up king, so that I could steal all his technical wizardry. I'd also like to be more proficient with a paintbrush, so if he were still about, I'd call on Pieter Bruegel for a master class.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
My ex-housemates/coursemates Luke Jinks, Jack Hudson and Adam Hancher; they're all very talented guys. And my older, illustrator sister, Heather Gatley!

Sam Chivers: Truth/Mystery

Released Tuesday, July 20, 2010


Truth/Mystery, by Sam Chivers.
15% of the sale of this print goes to the Shama Foundation.

Sam Chivers started illustrating professionally about ten years ago. In 2004, he started making screen prints. Sam likes the printmaking process, because the repetitive action of it all makes you feel like your own robot, yet each one turns out differently, so you’re forced to accept a certain level of serendipity.

In recent years, Sam’s work has become less figurative in favour of abstract forms, but it’s still bound by certain compositional rules – which he says in time, may have to go.



About the print:
This print is the first time I’ve done something with type that hasn’t been a poster. The relationship between the two words ‘Truth’ and ‘Mystery’ has appealed to me for a while – it’s not as straightforward as one would think, and always leads down a pathway to those bigger, more fundamental questions. So, in that sense this print has a spiritual angle. It’s intended as a meditative piece; I’m not trying to answer anything here, it’s more about finding questions.

This is a two-color screenprint on 220gsm Fabriano Rosapina paper, embellished with gold leaf. Each was signed and numbered by the artist.

PURCHASE $70!





What is your process?
I doodle on discarded envelopes at work when I’m bored. When I’m not consciously thinking about what I’m doing, I generally get better results. Illustrating can be a very prescriptive process, so for me it’s important to make first and ask questions later, whenever possible.

What has inspired you recently?
Science. The Hadron Collider, Freeman Dyson’s Dyson trees, the Herschel Telescope, and HM Cancri – a star system consisting of two stars that orbit each other every five minutes at over a million miles an hour. We live in golden age of available information.

Why did you choose to pair the Shama Foundation with your print?
Madagascar is mostly known for its weird and freaky wildlife, but the rapid erosion of the environment there necessitates the need for education more now than it ever has.



How have you seen art transform the world around you?
That’s a general question – to answer it properly would require an essay. I’ll answer it as literally as I can. I went to an interactive play recently that was staged in an abandoned department store in my local neighborhood. It was loosely based on Chekhov’s ‘The Cherry Orchard’. The whole building that had been familiar to me as a shop three years earlier was transformed into something else entirely. The play itself was as much about the building and its secret history and eventual demise as the characters the play portrayed.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
Alejandro Jodorowsky. He knows the archetypes, he knows how to fail, and he is wise.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Brian Eno - not his music but his installations. Victor Timofeev, Mark Jenkins, The P!nch.

Linda Kim: Wanderlust

Released Tuesday, July 13, 2010


Wanderlust, by Linda Kim.
15% of the sale of this print goes to the Kids In Need Foundation.

Linda Kim is a Los Angeles-based illustrator and designer. After working in the real world for a bit, she decided to go back to school to pursue illustration. She was born and raised in southern California and had the good fortune of growing up with the ocean, mountains, and the city all being in close proximity to one another. This allowed her to explore many facets of the world around her and to satisfy her curiosity through different cultures, foods, and people. She grew up on Saturday morning cartoons and getting lost in books and films. She wants to one day write and illustrate her own children's books because of the books and stories she so fondly remembers while growing up. Linda loves people, friends, coffee, food, music, mystery, history, science, the ocean, and the universe.



About the print:
I always love a good adventure or mystery. When I was young, I wanted to be an archaeologist and discover clues to ancient pasts or to find new, unknown things. This is probably where my idea for this print came from. Although I didn’t have a definite idea of how this image would turn out, it seems as if the subject matter manifested itself from a dream that my younger self may have had.

This is a giclée print on Velvet Fine Arts Paper. Each was signed and numbered by the artist.

PURCHASE $30!





What has inspired you recently?
People inspire me, from friends to random strangers. I love listening to people and the stories they have to tell. Nature also inspires me. I live in the foothills of a large mountain range and so oftentimes, I will go hiking along a trail up the mountains. Seeing how vast and big the mountains are and how small I am compared to them is humbling. Seeing all the wildlife fighting to survive so effortlessly is also inspiring.

Why did you choose to pair the Kids In Need Foundation with your print?
I value education for kids. I feel that the more kids know about their world, the more they grow up with a passion to learn and an awareness of world issues and their surroundings. I think that some of the smartest people in this world are kids, and providing them with the necessary tools for a healthy classroom environment will allow them to see that people care about them and care about what they have to say.



How have you seen art transform the world around you?
I feel that some art creates discussion and builds communities, while other art provides a world to escape into. Some are controversial or have an agenda while others are purely for enjoyment. I appreciate all these types of art forms because ultimately, if a person stops to look, think, discuss, and/or wonder when they see a piece of artwork, they have transformed in some way, and growth is a beautiful thing.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
I feel fortunate to have been mentored by some great instructors during my studies in art and I am so thankful for that. If I had to choose one art mentor though, it would be Magritte, Monet, or Cezanne. I like their visual contemplation and exploration of time and space.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Charley Harper, Margaret Kilgallen, Aubrey Beardsley, Sterling Hundley, Marian Bantjes, Ernst Haeckel, Olaf Hajek, Geoff McFetridge, Joe Sorren.

Wendy Marchbanks: Balance

Released Tuesday, July 6, 2010


Balance, by Wendy Marchbanks.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Smile Train.

Wendy Marchbanks graduated from Central Saint Martins with a degree in Textile Design, and then went on to do an MA in Printed Textiles at the Royal College of Art in London. She now lives in Buckinghamshire with her boyfriend, a graphic designer, and works as a freelance textile designer/illustrator.

Wendy is currently freelancing in London at a company called Skew, designing print, patterns and products for children’s licensing brands. Wendy loves that in freelancing, no two jobs are ever the same, and that you never quite know what’s going to come up next. Freelancing keeps her on her toes.



About the print:
Throughout this piece I was thinking about how you can create movement within a static artwork. This piece gives the viewer the suggestion of movement, but leaves them to imagine what happens next.

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $30!





What is your process?
My first port of call are my local antique and charity shops. I love sifting through the strange assortment of objects and books, looking for something unusual to spark off an idea. I then refer back to my own collection of antique books, to find interesting illustrations, patterns and mark making. I spend a lot of time drawing objects, so I have a selection of things I can work with. I find that the more drawings I have to play with from the start, the more interesting my compositions become. After drawing everything by hand, I then scan everything in to the computer. I love the freedom the computer gives you when you are building a composition. You can move objects around, and change colours so easily, until you have something you're really happy with.

What has inspired you recently?
I recently visited the Salvador Dali museum in Barcelona. I love the imagination and strange quality of Dali’s work. I’m really drawn in by pieces that tell a story, or take you into another world.

Why did you choose to pair Smile Train with your print?
I think what touched me about this charity is the fact that the operation to fix a cleft palette is a relatively cheap and standard procedure, and a child born into a more wealthy country would have access to this surgery. For children with this problem, born into some of the poorest countries, it is impossible for the parents to ever afford this surgery without help from charities such as Smile Train. Two hundred and fifty dollars, which is the price of the cleft surgery, is a really small price to pay to give a child a new start in life.



How have you seen art transform the world around you?
I think art is a form of escapism. To me, the reality of day-to-day life can be pretty dull. Art is like reading a great book, or watching a film, it can really take you away from the mundane to a more exciting place.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
My favourite artist/ designer is a guy called Josef Frank. He was a Scandinavian designer, and they have a range of his designs for sale as fabrics in Liberties, London. He had such a great eye for colour and composition. I think there is lots I could learn from him.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Tove Jansson, the illustrator and writer of the Moomin books. I also really love Marc Boutavant's work.