Heisuke Kitazawa: Dance Party

Released Tuesday, May 31, 2011


Dance Party, by Heisuke Kitazawa.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Puppies Behind Bars.

After living in Los Angeles for 16 years, Heisuke Kitazawa aka PCP, is now based in Tokyo, Japan, where he works as a freelance illustrator and designer. Heisuke has worked on various projects for companies such as Nickelodeon, The Guardian, Honda, Sony Music Entertainment, and Kenzo Parfums. He is also involved in numerous music projects with bands like Her Space HolidaySuper Furry AnimalsGrand HallwayThe Postal Service and Dublab. Heisuke is currently writing a new picture book about an army of zombies and book burning.

About the print:
Dance Party is about how we can/can't coexist with others.

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $30!




What has inspired you recently?
The Age of Adz, by Sufjan Stevens.



Why did you choose to pair Puppies Behind Bars with your print?
I chose to pair my print with Puppies Behind Bars, as it seemed to best fit the theme of this print. I also love dogs (and cats - I take no sides).

How have you seen art transform the world around you?
All of the drawings that my three-year-old daughter and her friends make - stuff that they make for fun, just to entertain themselves, and not for commercial purpose by any means - makes me realize what "art" really is.



If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
Henry Darger. For one, I love his style, colors, methods, everything. And since his art was only recognized after his death, I want to tell him how awesome he is, before he is dead and cold.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Brendan Monroe.

Jez Burrows: Sea Dream

Released Tuesday, May 24, 2011


Sea Dream, by Jez Burrows.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Médecins Sans Frontières.

Jez Burrows is a designer and illustrator originally from the South West of England, now living in Edinburgh. He studied graphic design from the University of Brighton, and since graduating in 2008 has worked with Nike, WNYC, The New York Times and lots more. Together with with illustratorLizzy Stewart, he also runs an independent press named Sing Statisticswhich publishes fiction and visual art. He enjoys forests. A lot.

About the print:
This is one of a series of Gocco prints made during a graphic arts fair called Pick Me Up, held in April 2011 at London's Somerset House. It's called Sea Dream and is based on a particularly nautical dream I didn't have, but am hoping to have at some point in the future.

This is a four-color Gocco print on 140 lb Canaletto Liscia, acid-free, 20% cotton paper. Each print was signed and numbered by the artist.

PURCHASE $30!




What has inspired you recently?
I've been researching heraldry a lot recently, which is something that I've always admired but never taken the time to investigate with any depth, until now. It's a true graphic language that feels strikingly modern, and has this enormous set of guidelines that define how everything should function together. It's incredible.

Oh, I've also been inspired by the second half of Abbey Road, which is also incredible. Particularly the Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End medley.



Why did you choose to pair Médecins Sans Frontières with your print?
I chose to pair my print with Médecins Sans Frontières because they're doing something important, difficult, and remarkable that I couldn't possibly hope to achieve.

How have you seen art transform the world around you?
I think of a very specific example from when I went to the NY MoMA quite a few years ago. Janet Cardiff's Forty-Part Motet was installed there, and I don't think I've ever seen a more serene room full of people in my life. Everybody was just lost in their own little world, listening to this beautiful, ancient piece of music. I stayed there for over an hour. There's something quite incredible about appreciating a piece of art in the company of a lot of strangers doing the same.



If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
Chris Ware, possibly. I don't make comics, but I feel like he could have a fantastic reference library of paper ephemera. Plus, I'd quite like to pick up a bit of ragtime piano.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
The three chaps who make up Nous Vous - Will EdmondsNicolas Burrows, and Jay Cover - are all obscenely talented and making brilliant work. William Goldsmith is an illustrator who just put out his first book with Jonathan Cape recently (Vignettes of Ystov), it's incredible. Oh, and Luke Pearson, who is making increasingly brilliant comics every day.

Harry Diaz: Same Sun

Released Tuesday, May 17, 2011


Same Sun, by Harry Diaz.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Teach For America.

Harry Diaz is a Guatemalan born artist. He lives and works in Los Angeles, CA. He recently completed his MFA from California State University, Long Beach.

His practice involves elements of printmaking, drawing, and digital media. Harry's work pays homage to traditional Guatemalan textile pattern. Additionally, his playful characters, whom weave in and out of the imagery, reference 50's and 60's American cartoons.



About the print:
This piece evolved from my memories of the Day of the Dead celebrations in Guatemala. They were always happy and celebratory events, despite the fact that dealing with the passing of loved ones is always a tough ordeal. Same Sun is about the forces of nature, life and death, and the afterlife.

This is a four-color screenprint on 140 lb Muscletone cover paper from French Paper. Each print was signed and numbered by the artist.

PURCHASE $40!




What has inspired you recently?
I live in downtown LA at the moment, and taking walks around the garment and toy districts are always fun.



Why did you choose to pair Teach For American with your print?
I chose to pair my print with Teach For America because I think that everyone should have access to great schools and educators.

How have you seen art transform the world around you?
It gives people who otherwise wouldn't be heard a voice.



If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
I'd have to choose Gert and Uwe Tobias, because I desperately want to know how they make those massive prints!

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
306Rick ReeseDOOOM, and Camilla Taylor.

Laszlito Kovacs: Vida Lenta

Released Tuesday, May 10, 2011


Vida Lenta, by Laszlito Kovacs.
15% of the sale of this print goes to 826 National.

Laszlito Kovacs lives and works 1.699 km from home. His colorful and optimistic illustrations have been published in some of the leading newspapers and magazines in Spain, such as "el País", "El Mundo", and "Club Cultura". In the Netherlands, he has been published in Bright Magazine, WWF Panda Mag, Adobe CS5 Mag, and de Volkskrant. In addition to being an artist, Laszlito is a curator at poolga.com, and the chief editor at endtopic.com.

Laszlito draws like a monkey all day long. He finds his inspiration in movies, pigs, candyfloss, music, deers, whales, penguins, his friends and family, and all of the things that make this world sweet and better.



About the print:
This print is called Vida Lenta, which translated means "Slow Life". It is a set of words for a way of living: slow, without stress, in a contemplative way.

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $30!




Tell us a little bit about the process for this piece.
I made some of the sketches consciously, and hundreds of them unconsciously, and they are spread far and wide in my notebook waiting to be rescued someday.

What has inspired you recently?
Recently, I’ve been re-watching the Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner animations that were directed by Chuck Jones. His sense of humour is an infinite inspiration.



Why did you choose to pair 826 National with your print?
I chose to pair my print with 826 National because of their work, which encourages an interest in reading and writing. Last summer I visited 826‘s Superhero Supply Company store in Brooklyn and it was one of the most exciting experiences of my life. I tried on a superhero outfit and my friend Anita took a picture of me. Then we had carrot cake just across the street and met a girl that could have been Steve Buscemi’s sister. We would both love to be her best friends.

How have you seen art transform the world around you?
I believe that art transforms people radically through inspiration. Art exists to depict reality and our dreams. In my case, I’d rather stay with the dreams.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
I’d choose Fortunato Depero, a fantastic futurist artist. His work has inspired many people, and his legacy brings us right here where we are now. That’s a futuristic vision, isn’t it?

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
I would love to see in the gallery artists such as Olimpia Zagnolli or Malika Favre. They are both great illustrators.

Santiago Uceda: The Visitor

Released Tuesday, May 3, 2011


The Visitor, by Santiago Uceda.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Little Kids Rock.

Santiago Uceda is an illustrator and designer originally from Peru who now resides in Corvallis, Oregon. His work can be found in magazines, gig posters, gallery shows, shoes, t-shirts, playing cards, murals and even a short-lived, online comic.



About the print:
This piece was originally created as a gig poster for Finn Riggins, a band from Idaho. I have been working with outer space and travel themes ever since I did a poster last year for a science and arts festival, where the theme was the cosmos. The theme for this piece is travel and discovery in other worlds.

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $30!




Tell us a little bit about the process for this piece.
I was playing with the idea of mixing space travel with floral elements. I'm not sure where the idea came from; sometimes I like to juxtapose elements that don't necessarily make sense together.

What has inspired you recently?
I find inspiration everywhere, though I try not to look for it in visuals, especially online. I am inspired by collaborations I'm working on - exchanging ideas with others usually leads to more inspired ideas.

How has your background influenced you?
My Catholic upbringing has influenced both my aesthetics and the themes you see in my work. My paintings often include images of Catholic iconography I would see every Sunday during mass. Seeing the 12 Stations of the Cross was probably my first exposure to visual narrative. As far as themes go, I often explore issues like trust, guilt, and duality.



What are you working on these days?
Lately I have been trying to teach myself how to animate my illustrations in After Effects. I have been working on small motion graphics projects at work, and also on my own experimentations in personal projects - I would like to work on an animated music video. One thing I like about animation is that you get to collaborate with other artists. I would like to collaborate with other artists more.

Why did you choose to pair Little Kids Rock with your print?
I chose Little Kids Rock for a couple of reasons: I have small children, they love music, and it seems like there is less of an emphasis in arts and music education in schools these days.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
I would choose Robert Rauschenberg as a mentor. He questioned the distinction between art objects and everyday objects. I remember going to junkyards when I was a student, looking for anything to paint on or use as art materials.