Debbie Powell: Hello Hand

Released Tuesday, July 26, 2011


Hello Hand, by Debbie Powell.
15% of the sale of this print goes to The Pablove Foundation.

Debbie Powell is a freelance illustrator and hand letterer living and working in London. She uses screenprinting, linocut, pencil, and water colour to create her imagery.

About the print:
Hello Hand was inspired by some jewellery pieces that my sister, father, and I make under the name Rah and Rah.

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $30!




What has inspired you recently?
Ancient jewellery, hand-made pottery, and African textiles.

Why did you choose to pair The Pablove Foundation with your print?
I can't put it better than Pablove's simple message: Kids get cancer too.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
Vera Neumann! She printed her first scarves from her kitchen table, travelled around the world for inspiration, and Marilyn Monroe was a fan!

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Alexander Calder, for his incredible jewellery and mobiles, and Sister Corita – a screenprinting nun.

Sandra Juto: Imaginary Friends

Released Tuesday, July 19, 2011


Imaginary Friends, by Sandra Juto.
15% of the sale of this print goes to The Jane Goodall Institute.

Sandra Juto lives and works in Berlin, Germany, which she moved to recently after living for over thirty years in Sweden. In 2009 she got her MFA from the School of Design and Crafts at Gothenburg University. She is self-employed and works as an artist, blogger, illustrator, and graphic designer, and runs an online shop where she sells her self-produced work. Her biggest passions are long walks, taking pictures, Twin Peaks marathons, having coffee, reading books at empty cafés, yarn, people watching, wine, and playing with other people's dogs.



About the print:
This artwork is about imaginary friends. I recently moved to a new country and have started wondering about friendship. Who is a real friend and who is imaginary? And does it matter?

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $30!




The images above are of the making of the original collage artwork.

What has inspired you recently?
Listening to Swedish radio, discovering my new city, taking some time off from socializing and the internet, learning more everyday German (the German that the schoolbooks don't teach)...

Why did you choose to pair The Jane Goodall Institute with your print?
Their motto says everything: "Empowering people to make a difference for all living things."



How have you seen art transform the world around you?
I don't know about the world in general, but I know that my own world has become a better place ever since I understood that I could work as an artist.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
This was the hardest question for me to answer. I've been trying to come up with a good person to name, but here is the truth: It took me quite some time to accept that I'm a lone wolf when it comes to my work life. I felt quite embarrassed about this for a long time. Seeing myself trying to sneak away every time I was in a group project made me understand that I couldn't go on forcing myself to work with others. After that realization, I felt much better.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Lisen AdbågeHanna Konola, and Gemma Correll are three ladies I admire - they are so passionate about their work, and always inspire me to be the same. The Pet Shop Boys are my all time favourite artists.

Gustavo Aimar: The Hidden City

Released Tuesday, July 12, 2011


The Hollow City, by Gustavo Aimar.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Farm Sanctuary.

Gustavo Aimar is an Argentinean graphic designer, illustrator, and fine artist who incorporates the many tools and resources from all of these disciplines into the making of his personal work. He experiments with all kind of materials, textures and media, both in his graphic creations, as well as in his objects and sculptures. The subject of his work transports us to the past, through melancholy and nostalgic language that is sometimes humorous, too.

Lately, his work is focused on children's illustrations. He has worked on more than a dozen books, and occasionally collaborates in diverse publications and projects.



About the print:
The Hollow City belongs to my personal work. Lately, I've been making artwork in which the human figure, and even animals, are completely absent. I like representing inanimate objects. Instead of recreating a landscape, I represent objects and places that are related to human activity. A hollow city represents to me the silence - an uncertain pause - a place where nothing moves and nothing has weight, which is very disturbing. The little magazine trimmings and pictures that appear as backgrounds speak about the same thing; they are there but they are not. They are like authentic ghosts or testimonials of something that happened there before.

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $30!




Do you have any process images for this piece?







All of the images above are of the making of the original artwork.

What has inspired you recently?
I enjoy working with a variety of materials. I collect all kinds of vintage and used papers, and eventually use them in my work. When I work for myself, I don't chase a particular idea. I let the piece itself or the materials tell me what to do. There is nothing in particular that inspires my work. Ideas are like air. They are all around; you never know when or where one might come from.

Why did you choose to pair Farm Sanctuary with your print?
I simply like participating in this kind of collective project, in which many people and artists collaborate, and it's even better if it is for a good goal. It stimulates me, and at the same time I feel the work one does gains new meaning.



How have you seen art transform the world around you?
I think that art in general, in any discipline, can contribute to making the world a better place to live in. Unfortunately, many people today are unable to see clearly where they are going or what they want to do. Art can be a tool to help with that, to create openness. It is an uphill battle, but not impossible. I do not know if that answers the question.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
Pablo Picasso, for daring to do everything without fear, without prejudice about what should or should not be a piece of art.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
There are so many: Morteza ZahediIsabelle ArsenaultToshiyuki Fukuda,Oscar SabiniSamuel Ribeyron, and Svjetlan Junaković.

Jill Bliss: Snail Moss

Released Tuesday, July 5, 2011


Snail Moss, by Jill Bliss.
15% of the sale of this print goes to American Forests.

A veritable Jill-of-all-trades, Jill Bliss and her artwork defy easy categorization. She is an imaginative illustrator and a capable and conscientious designer who works with eco-friendly materials and local businesses. She draws, paints, creates murals, and executes custom art and design commissions.

Jill’s creative output finds its inspiration in the intricate details of the natural world around her; plants, trees, animals, tide pools and forests, as well as in urban architectural forms. Her deceptively simple, nature-inspired style stems from her growing up in a do-it-yourself household surrounded by nature in Northern California, and then going to art school in New York [Parsons] and San Francisco [CCA].

Since 2001, Jill has been selling her artwork, stationery and fabric goods directly to fans online or via indie boutiques and art galleries around the world as well as working with Chronicle Books in San Francisco and i-Pop magnets in Seattle. Jill now calls Portland, Oregon home, and teaches in the graphic design department at Portland State University.



About the print:
These are snail moss from my anima series, an ongoing study of native Pacific Northwest animals and the ecosystems in which they live.

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $30!



What has inspired you recently?
Learning more about my adopted home, the Pacific Northwest, and how it's both similar and different to my native area, Northern California.

Why did you choose to pair American Forests with your print?
I paired my print with American Forests, because I love forests! And so do snails and moss!



How have you seen art transform the world around you?
I am constantly amazed and inspired to hear stories about how my own art has inspired others to learn more about the world around them, or to do their own creative work!

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
It would be fun to have a drink with Vera Neumann or Edith Heath!