Jenny Kim: Coffee Deer

Released Tuesday, December 20, 2011

PLEASE NOTE: We will be taking next week off for the holidays. Our next print release will be on Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012. Enjoy the holiday and thank you for all of your support in 2011!


Coffee Deer, by Jenny Kim.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Puppies Behind Bars.

Jenny Kim is an illustrator and graphic designer living in Vancouver, Canada. She currently divides her time working as an in-house graphic designer at Aritzia, and working as a freelance illustrator. When Jenny is not working, she practices her ukulele, rummages through thrift shops, or attempts to master a new recipe from her brand new cookbook.



About the print:
This particular piece, Coffee Deer, was one of the four illustrations I put together to pitch a coffee cup illustration for a local Canadian coffee company. Inspired by coffee stains and Canadian/west coast animals, I created the series by combining charcoal drawings and abstract coffee-colored washes.

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $30!




What has inspired you recently?
I recently took a trip to New York City. It was my third visit in four years, yet the city never ceases to inspire me. Like most artists and creatives, I often experience inspiration blocks, but most of the time I let it be and wait for my next wave of inspiration (I do believe inspiration comes in waves). Occasionally, I will make random trips and go gallery hopping, snap photos of unfamiliar places and unfamiliar people, or just simply surround myself with new and fresh things. That usually helps to trigger the right side of my brain.

Why did you choose to pair Puppies Behind Bars with your print?
I’d like to pair my art with Puppies Behind Bars. I’ve always had a soft spot for dogs, especially service dogs. I see great value in training dogs for the disabled or explosive detection canines for law enforcement, and also in the contribution these dogs make to those people in need of their service, love, and companionship.

How have you seen art transform the world around you?
I think the greatest thing art has taught me is to see beauty in the most unexpected things and places.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
I’d love to meet over coffee with artists like Andy Goldsworthy, Jaques Tati, Naoko Ogigami, Pina Bausch, Henry Darger, and Jean-Jacques Sempe.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
People should check out the works of Sam Weber, Micah Lidberg, Alex Kanevsky, and Takashi Iwasaki.


Gemma Correll: Have You Hugged Your Cat Today?

Released Tuesday, December 13, 2011



Have You Hugged Your Cat Today?, by Gemma Correll.
15% of the sale of this print goes to the Pablove Foundation.

Gemma Correll is a freelance illustrator/cartoonist/maker-of-things-with-pugs-and-cats-on-them from England. She has worked for clients all over the world, including Hermés, Real Simple and Hallmark. Her drawing style is a distinctive mix of humour, playfulness and terrible word puns, conveyed in simple lines and colors. She has been described as the "worst cartoonist in the world" by a charming young blogger from Australia.

Gemma is the proud owner of two pugs, several broken cellphones (she is clumsy), and a large collection of fineliner pens. When she's not drawing, Gemma can be found drinking coffee, foraging in junk shops for kitchy ornaments, and making her pugs wear silly jumpers.



About the print:
I guess the idea behind Have You Hugged Your Cat Today? is fairly self-explanatory. I don't have a cat myself - I have a pug, which is kind of like a cat except that he's actually a dog - but I find that a hug from a small animal (cat, dog - not so much a rattlesnake or a plague-carrying rat) cures pretty much any ill.

Update: Since writing this interview, Gemma has aquired another pug.

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $30!



Process: The initial drawing from Gemma's sketchbook.

What has inspired you recently?
I go through phases of being very inspired by certain themes and objects. At the moment, it's vintage postcards and vacation souvenirs. I especially love the old seaside postcards with risqué cartoons on them, or interactive cards where you'd tick boxes to let the folks at home know about your trip. e.g:
"The Weather here is: ☐ Great ☐ OK ☐ Indescribably awful".

Why did you choose to pair the Pablove Foundation with your print?
It was difficult to choose from such a worthy list of charities, but I feel that the work that the Pablove Foundation does is particularly important.



How have you seen art transform the world around you?
Personally, art has given me a voice in a world where it can be difficult to be an introvert. I was extremely shy and unconfident growing up, but writing and drawing helped me to express, document, and to some extent understand the world around me. On a wider level, comics and cartoons make people laugh, which can only be a good thing.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
Liza Donnely. She's really funny, and I'd love to hear more about being a female cartoonist in what is really a male-dominated industry.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Well, of course there's my fiancé, Anthony Zinonos. I also just adore Mia Christopher's beautiful work, and never fail to giggle at Simone Lia's comics.

Heather Moore: Seeking

Released Tuesday, December 6, 2011


Seeking, by Heather Moore.
15% of the sale of this print goes to the Jane Goodall Foundation.

Heather Moore is a self-taught illustrator and designer from Cape Town, South Africa. Most of the time, she works on her design label, Skinny laMinx, producing screenprinted textile goods, but whenever she gets the chance, she loves to work on papercut illustration. Moore makes her illustrations very slowly, using a sharp blade on her NT cutter. Once a paper cutout is complete, she often scans it and reworks it in Illustrator, for use as a book or magazine illustration, and often, a new textile design.

About the print:
Seeking started out as a cut paper illustration, originally commissioned by a South African advertising industry magazine. I like to cut things from a single piece of paper, which means that many of my illustrations are reproduced simply in a single color. With this one, however, I enjoyed repeating and reversing aspects of the original, and coming up with a three-color silkscreen print.

This is a three-color screenprint on acid-free paper. Each print was signed and numbered by the artist.

PURCHASE $50!




What has inspired you recently?
On a recent trip to the USA, I visited the De Young museum in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park, where I saw the beautiful work of Ruth Asawa. I had seen occasional reproductions of her work before, but as is so often the case, it's only when you see work in real life, at life-sized scale, that you get an idea of how beautiful it is.

Why did you choose to pair the Jane Goodall Foundation with your print?
I chose to pair my print with the Jane Goodall Foundation. As I live in Africa, I wanted to choose a charity that has a positive impact on my continent. Also, I think gorillas are adorable.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
A designer like Lucienne Day would be my ultimate mentor. What I find wondrous about her work is the ease with which she seems to make it, and I always wonder, "how did she know to stop, right at that point?'.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Of course, the work of my husband, Paul Edmunds, is something that everyone should know about. He currently has a solo exhibition of his work at RH Gallery in Duane Street, Tribeca, and has work in the collection of MoMA as well.