Berkley Illustration: Chlorophyll Bill

Released Tuesday, February 28, 2012


Chlorophyll Bill, by Berkley Illustration.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Farm Sanctuary.

Ryan Berkley creates comic book inspired art and prints for your walls or family photo albums. Perhaps best known for his Animals in Suits series, Ryan likes to tackle surreal subject matter in a very friendly way. He and his wife Lucy run a successful art business on Etsy, participate in craft shows around the country, and have licensed their imagery to several companies. Hot insider animal tip: Ryan's favorite animal is the tiger shark and Lucy's is the bison.

About the print:
This is more detailed version of a drawing I did a few years ago titled "Earth Hat Pat". I wanted to blend and weave plants, branches, vines and colorful flowers into a drab, neutral, earthy figure. It was loosely inspired by a framed greeting card from the 70's that my parents had in our house growing up.

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $60!



An earlier process drawing.

What has inspired you recently?
I've been really into old, detailed clip art and lithographs from the turn of the century or earlier. Ships, animals, contraptions, weaponry, clothing, nature, etc.

Why did you choose to pair Farm Sanctuary with your print?
For me, Farm Sanctuary was a quick and easy choice. As a vegan and animal lover, this cause is very important to me. I've always had a genuine love and respect for animals, and I am very appreciative of the opportunity The Working Proof provides us with to support Farm Sanctuary with this project. Farm Sanctuary gives rescued animals (from farms and slaughterhouses) a second chance at life. They pamper them and treat them like local celebrities as they enjoy the rest of their well-deserved years.

How have you seen art transform the world around you?
The world around me, for the most part, is the DIY movement. Animal art has become extremely prominent in the DIY/craft world. It's funny, because drawing animals is definitely how I make a living, but I really enjoy not drawing animals when I have the chance. It's refreshing. That's why I took this opportunity to flex my other creative artistic muscles with The Working Proof.



If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
I'm a comic fan/artist at heart, so I am mostly influenced by comic artists. I would choose Alex Ross to be my mentor. I would say that I attempt to make somewhat photorealistic art (especially with the animal series), and he is the master of that style in the comics world. Whenever I read his books, I actually feel like the story is unfolding like a movie before my eyes - it is so realistic. I think it would be interesting to have my fans get lost in my art the way I do in his.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Matt Furie, Lisa Hanawalt, Stacey Rozich, Tyler Stout, Josh Keyes.

Ching Ching Cheng: Love

Released Tuesday, February 21, 2012


Love, by Ching Ching Cheng.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Farm Sanctuary.

Ching Ching Cheng always immerses herself in the subject matter of her artwork, so that her work gives an intimate and personal account of her own experiences, while simultaneously encouraging the viewer to recall their own. Ching Ching’s work is symbolic and conceptual. She presents subject matter outside the self from this psychological position. This intimate gesture allows for a personal connection to be forged by the viewer with the work. Ultimately, there is no definitive subject, but only a meditation on personal experience and emotion. Ching Ching challenges herself through drawing - solving problems and difficult ideas. Most of her work is in mixed media - using ink, watercolor, gouache, and acrylic. She works digitally and traditionally, as well as three dimensionally, and likes to experiment with different techniques and mediums. The color of her work is very subtle and quiet.

About the print:
The title of this artwork is called Love. There are always many ups and downs in a relationship. We fight and argue because we love each other; we also hug and kiss because we love each other.

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $35!




What has inspired you recently?
The subject matter that influences and inspires my work the most comes from psychology and nature. The different ways that people deal with situations varies so much, and I find that very special and interesting.

Why did you choose to pair Farm Sanctuary with your print?
I chose Farm Sanctuary because I love all animals, and also think it is important to understand where our food comes from. I have two dogs, one cat, one turtle, and 40+ fishes! The zoo is still growing!

How have you seen art transform the world around you?
Yes, of course. Just like The Working Proof, with the sale of each artwork, artists and buyers can help improve the world!

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
Kiki Smith. I just love her work!

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Chase Osborne (my husband), Tim HawkinsonMike Kelley, and Kiki Smith.

Will Scobie: Midnight's Dragon

Released Friday, February 17, 2012


Midnight's Dragon, by Will Scobie.
15% of the sale of this print goes to American Forests.

Will Scobie is a tea drinking, pencil scrawling, pen wielding, squeegee pulling, vector tweaking illustrator from Brighton, UK. He produces fun and unusual illustrations for design companies, publishers, advertising agencies, and other diverse clients worldwide. His work is based around the idea of the continuous line and graphic simplicity.



About the print:
I chose a dragon for this piece, because visually dragons are really inspiring to draw, being made up of lots of interesting shapes and lines. In my work, I am always aiming for graphic simplicity that incorporates different ideas, but I also try to keep a fun feeling by adding unusual details.

This is a digital print on acid free, Neenah uncoated matte 100lb cover paper that is 80% recycled. It was digitally signed by the artist and was numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $35!



My work always starts with a drawing before its rendered up to a vector, or painted.

What has inspired you recently?
Recent things that have inspired me include David Lynch (I have recently been watching Twin Peaks), coffee, Haruki Murakami’s book 19Q4, the Monsters soundtrack by Jon Hopkins, and Tom Waits.

Why did you choose to pair American Forests with your print?
I chose to pair my print with American Forests because nature and the environment are so often neglected by humanity, and it is so important that we help maintain a healthy world by keeping forests alive. Aside from this, nature is one of my main sources of inspiration.


How have you seen art transform the world around you?
We are now in the digital age, so everything in the art world is a lot more accessible and instant, which can be positive in terms of discovering new artists, and getting your work seen if you are just starting out. I do feel like more traditional techniques are gaining interest, though, as people want to step away from their computers, and look at something handmade and full of character.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
One of my favourite artists is Dave McKean. He’s got such a strong imagination which he can visualise in a beautifully organic, but graphic way.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Genevieve Gauckler, Boris Pelcer, Raymond Lemstra, the collective Rinzen, Theory One, and Richard Perez.

OSoo: Deer

Released Tuesday, February 7, 2012



Deer, by OSoo.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Doctors Without Borders.

Soo Hwangbo, aka OSoo, is an artist living and working in Los Angeles with her husband. After receiving her BFA in fine art and design from Cornish College of the Arts, Soo studied architecture at the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc). Since then, she has worked in the fashion industry, interior design, and architecture.



About the print:
The deer and its antlers reminds me of what it is like to be feminine and how fabulous nature is. The antlers are iconic and I wanted to represent them in a certain way that encapsulates my current interests in material qualities, fashion, style, and patterns of the Art Deco period.

This was printed on archival Epson Velvet Fine Art paper with archival Epson pigment inks. It was signed by the artist and numbered by The Working Proof.

PURCHASE $30!



What have you been up to since we last worked together?
The past year I moved from New York City to Los Angeles. It was a big move that wasn't an easy decision, but along the way I have experienced some rewarding moments of relaxation and being outdoors. It has also allowed me to do some home decorating with my husband as we renovate our new place.

Your work often features animals and beautiful patterns. How does one inform the other?
There is an almost unlimited variety of animals, yet each has a unique characteristic that allows them to be distinguished from one another. When I paint the animals, I like to focus on their traits and blend them with patterns taken from their characteristics.

How has your work developed over the last year?
I've been exploring different interests.

What is inspiring you these days?
Lately, I've been inspired by bold industrial designs that come from machinery and manufacturing. Blending that with a subtle sense of femininity is interesting. I see this a lot in the Art Deco period and find it fascinating!

Why did you choose to pair Doctors Without Borders with your print?
I chose to pair this print with the Doctors Without Borders charity because I believe in human compassion. Doctors Without Borders is a life-saving organization that provides care to people that otherwise would have no opportunity for health-care, food, water, and sanitation. Human compassion may be something that can change the world, if not the lives in it.