Elisabeth Timpone: Balancing Act

Released Tuesday, June 26, 2012

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Balancing Act, by Elisabeth Timpone.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Action for Healthy Kids.

Elisabeth Timpone  is an artist, designer and explorer who grew up on an island in New York City where wild turkeys and deer still prosper. As a young girl she vacationed on the Chester River where her imagination was nourished by the natural world around her. She awoke each morning to the sounds of geese and she was gently rocked to sleep by the stillness of the night. With inspiration from her artistic kin she attended Parsons The New School for Design, graduating in 2005 with a BFA in Communication Design and a mind buzzing with artistic expression. Elisabeth emerged onto the art scene soon after graduating and began exhibiting her work at Giant Robot a small gallery in the East Village, where her passion for delicately inked lines and intricate patterns was unleashed. Since her start, her work has been shown throughout the US in galleries such as Fourth Wall Project in Boston, MA, Thinkspace Gallery in Los Angeles, CA and AdHoc in Brooklyn, NY. Her work has also been used for special events at Madewell and at Eagle Street Rooftop Farms, a beautiful farm in Greenpoint, BK. Recognized by people from across the world, Elisabeth's work can be found printed on pages, published on skin, and posted on the walls of private collectors near and far. Often compared to Native American art and topographical maps, her work whispers stories of the forest where animals live to play and fight to survive in a world that demands balance, respect and love from all who call it home.

Elisabeth lives in Brooklyn, NY where she has a small studio and an even smaller dog.

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About the print:
The piece I submitted is called‚ Balancing Act. It was first shown at, Giant Robot in LA and was purchased by a woman who was expecting her third child. I'm always grateful when people share their stories with me. It makes my experience as an artist all the richer and deepens the meaning of my work.

This print is available in multiple sizes. It was digitally signed by the artist. The 8x10 and 11x14 prints are numbered by The Working Proof, and the 20x16 prints come with a numbered Certificate of Authenticity. Learn more here.

PURCHASE!

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What has inspired you recently?
I've been re-visiting a lot of the great NYC museums. The spaces that house their diverse collections and the pure density of art really gets me fired up. My recent visits have been to MOMA to see Cindy Sherman's photography exhibition, The Museum of Natural History to stare in amazement at sea creatures and dinosaur bones and The Brooklyn Museum to see Keith Haring's work.

Why did you choose to pair with Action for Healthy Kids with your print?
I chose Action for Healthy Kids because I believe in preventive care, I believe food is medicine, I believe in movement and I believe in knowledge. Teaching a child how important it is to eat whole, unprocessed foods from a young age can help prevent a multitude of problems and can encourage them to lead a nourishing and active life.

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How have you seen art transform the world around you?
I've always really loved public art and the way it interacts with its surroundings and changes over time due to touch, sun fade, scenery changes etc. Whether it be Carole A. Feuerman's life-size swimmer sculptures, Janet Cardiff's audio walks or Swoon's wheat-pasted drawings, and whether you like them or you don't, they always create dialogue and I think dialogue can transform the world.

If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
I've always wanted to visit the Elephant House, Edward Gorey's home up in Cape Code that's currently open to the public. If he were still alive, I'd love to spend the day with him. He is a master.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
There are many artist who have inspired me but my greatest passion lies in the art of African, Indian, and American Indian cultures. The intricate patterns that are woven into clothing, beaded into necklaces, carved into funerary objects or painted on skin, are all created by the most talented artists that ever lived. I think it's important to look at these pieces to see how these cultures have influenced fashion, architecture, painting and textiles that adorn the art world today.

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Katy Horan: Untitled

Released Tuesday, June 19, 2012

print imageUntitled, by Katy Horan.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Computers for Youth.

Katy Horan  makes paintings and drawings that explore a range of interests including (but definitely not limited to) Victorian femininity, mourning practices, historical dress and female archetypes. She works to bring these sometimes disparate sources of inspiration together in heavily detailed and often ambiguous images.

She received her BFA in Illustration from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2003. Since then, her work has been shown in New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Toronto and published in a number of art books including The Exquisite Book and Drawn In, as well as in magazines such as Juxtapoz and New American Paintings. From Houston, Tx, she now lives in Austin, Tx with her husband and two dogs. She is currently working on future exhibitions, and hopes to some day illustrate a book or two.

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About the print:
I love ghosts, always have. From time to time, a ghost will just show up somewhere in my work, regardless of whatever subject that I am working with at the time. I have collected a number of images of Victorian spirit photography and seances that I just keep around and those directly informed this piece. I thought I might do an entire series like this. I may still some day, but for now this is the only one.

This print is available in multiple sizes. It was digitally signed by the artist. The 8x10 and 11x14 prints are numbered by The Working Proof. Learn more here.

PURCHASE!

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What has inspired you recently?
I am working on some images inspired by victorian widows and mourning practices, but these will probably be the last on that subject. I am also working on some pieces about female fear/hysteria. They are inspired mainly by the victorian figure of the hysterical woman and classic horror stories. I like that all my new characters are in some level of distress or horror, but some are dealing with terrors that are external while other's are internal.

Why did you choose to pair with Computers for Youth with your print?
I chose Computers for Youth because I believe every child regardless of where they live or how much money their family has deserves an equal shot at education.

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If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
OMG Kiki Smith! I am a huge fan, and am not afraid to geek out about it. I love the way she moves so fluently between drawing, sculpture and printmaking. Her work is often about female figures and archetypes and I love the way she will create multiple variations of one character. Plus she just seems like the kind of lady you could just sit around with drinking tea and talking about witches.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Stephanie Chambers makes wonderful paintings of nature, Sara Vanderbeek is an amazing portrait painter who is currently working on a huge series of portraits of artists with their work, Rachel Mosler makes beautifully ethereal paintings and drawings, Alex Lukas makes insane mixed media drawings of post apocalyptic cities and landscapes, and Alexis Mackenzie makes the most wonderfully delicate collages.

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Tom Long: Lightly Seared on the Reality Grill

Released Tuesday, June 12, 2012

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Lightly Seared on the Reality Grill, by Tom Long.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Computers for Youth.

Tom Long lives in Brooklyn and works as an art restorer. Tom grew up in Texas and received an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2006. He has since been aimlessly biking around Brooklyn, honing his craft, and trying to give meditation a go.

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About the print:
Lightly Seared on the Reality Grill is a tip of the hat to Iain M. Banks, who's science fiction I enjoy. Lightly Seared on the Reality Grill is the name of a spaceship in one of his books. His spaceships have these neat engines that exist and operate in a fifth dimension as well as 4D space-time. I think Phillip Dick said something to the effect that fiction is about "what if?" and science fiction is about "my God, what if?!". Anyways, the point is that these engines kind of conceptually make sense, but they are fantastical and ultimately non-visualizable. And in fact, we are discovering that many aspects of reality are non-visualizable, from subatomic phenomena to the warping of space-time. So I liked the idea of illustrating one of these impossible engines.

This print is available in multiple sizes. It was digitally signed by the artist. The 11x14 prints are numbered by The Working Proof, and the 20x16 prints come with a numbered Certificate of Authenticity. Learn more here.

PURCHASE!

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What has inspired you recently?
I'm inspired by music, fresh air, kicking back with my friends, the visual culture of NYC and the world, and learning/re-learning new things. Every couple of years I re-read The Conscious Universe and try to get anyone with physics-nerdish impulses to check it out.

Why did you choose to pair with Computers for Youth with your print?
I chose to work with Computers for Youth because education and access to technology gives people a window to a larger world than they might not otherwise be exposed to. Computers for Youth is also a local organization here in NYC.

How have you seen art transform the world around you?
Art can make the world around you more pleasurable, tie a living room together, etc, though these effects might fall short of transformative. The process of art making can be therapeutic; language is a limited system and art can be a powerful tool for expressing inner states that transcend words. I think visual art as a perceived object can have its greatest effect in the quiet, personal exchange between the viewer and the work, where the work itself is co-created and the viewer's reality is broadened/deepened. At best, this aesthetic experience can engender an open-hearted attitude. I think this is a rare thing, and unfortunately, lots of people are shut out of this uncommon experience because of circumstance or personal lack of interest.

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If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
I'm a big Hokusai fan (not literally, harhar), but he had such creative longevity and vitality. He pursued the Japanese conception of excellence all his life, constantly fleeing his reputation and staying hungry. He also ran a studio, which required him to be a mix of creator, producer, mentor, and manager.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Carl Baratta
Cindy Daignault
Deirdre O'Dwyer
Nathan Gwynne
Jessica Hargreaves
Joseph Phillips
Kristy Caldwell

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Colin Johnson: The Nth Degree

Released Tuesday, June 5, 2012

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The Nth Degree, by Colin Johnson.
15% of the sale of this print goes to Farm Sanctuary.

Colin Johnson has been a professional freelance illustrator and gallery artist since his graduation from The Maryland Institute College of Art in the Spring of 1995. His work has received honors from Print's Regional Design Annual, The Society of Publication Design, Communication Arts Illustration Annual, American Illustration, and Society of Illustrators Los Angeles from which he received the "Gold Award" in the editorial category for the Illustration West 43 contest and "Best In Show" for the the Illustration West 46 contest. Some of his freelance illustration clients include: American Airlines, The American Medical Association, Audubon, Better Homes and Gardens, The Chicago Tribune, Converse, Epoch Films, Fast Company, The Harvard Business Review, National Geographic, The New York Times, Newsweek, Raygun, Time Inc., and U.S. News and World Report. He has recently been a part of gallery shows in: Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Denver, Portland, Hamburg (Germany), Melbourne (Australia), and Rome (Italy). Colin lives and works in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota.

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About the print:
The print is called "The Nth Degree" and showcases a collage style that I have developed over the years and dubbed "hyper-collage" due to the intense complexity and dense amount of collage and painting work combined in these types of pieces. The title refers somewhat specifically to the fact that every element of the composition is taken literally to the "nth degree" in terms of the large numbers of collage elements needed to fill every tiny space on the surface of the artwork.

Typically, I do not create process drawings or sketches when I work on these types of collage pieces. Usually I started with a painted background and then simply begin gluing collage elements and then painting, gluing, painting, gluing, etc...until the work is complete. This particular piece took an entire month to finish.

This print is available in multiple sizes. It was digitally signed by the artist. The 8x10 and 11x14 prints are numbered by The Working Proof, and the 20x16 prints come with a numbered Certificate of Authenticity. Learn more here.

PURCHASE!

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What has inspired you recently?
I'm an avid toy collector and as such have been greatly inspired by looking at toys in my own collection and toys that I have been researching online.  I'm inspired by both the toy designs of vintage toys in my collection and also greatly inspired by their colors. Color is really big inspiration to me. Sometimes I get one color in my head and I have to do a collage piece to get it out my system.

Why did you choose to pair with Farm Sanctuary with your print?
I have no specific reason for pairing the image that I selected with the specific charity that I chose. However, I'm very happy to support Farm Sanctuary since I'm a big animal lover. I had a rescue dog myself and she was a great companion. Unfortunately she had cancer and passed away earlier this year but she changed my life and outlook on the treatment of all animals on this planet. As such, I'm very happy to hear about animals being rescued and given good homes. I hope that my artwork will help to benefit that cause.

How have you seen art transform the world around you?
Art has transformed the world in so many ways that it's really hard to understand or weigh the impact. It wasn't until I reached adulthood that I began to understand to what degree artists and designers have contributed to society. From art in museums to murals, to actual buildings that make up the cities that we live in, and all created by artists. Street signs, cars, traffic lights, right down to the dots on the road that divide traffic on the highway, all created and conceived of by artists. As well as being practical, art can also have a healing factor. I know many artists who have survived very serious health conditions like cancer and credit the making of art as a means of survival that helped them through the process and ultimately gave them reason to live.

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If you could pick one artist to mentor you, who would it be?
This is a tough one. I could probably go with a number of different artists on this one if I had time to give it more thought. But I'd possibly choose Robert Rauschenberg as a mentor. He had a great intuitive sensibility when it came to art making and also a great business sense. I'm sure I could have learned a lot from his advice and guidance.

Who are some artists you think people should know about?
Five buddies of mine who are really remarkable artists that everyone should know about are:
Jason Limon
Dan May
Robert Hardgrave
Robert Steven Connett
Leah Palmer Preiss

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